The Icelandic band Sigur Ros gives film-makers complete artistic freedom (and a modest budget) to create visuals for tracks from their newest album Valtari. There is more to come, but our fav so far is Varud, directed by star photographer and long-time darling of the art world, Ryan McGinley. Rather than promoting specific tracks, with this series the band wants to discover what kind of visuals their music could inspire. So far, six creative minds worked their creative mojo, with each creator bringing his own aesthetic and subject matter, ranging from the NYC streets (McGinley) to meditations on changes (Arni & Kinski), and the dramatics of letting a beloved person go (Alma Har’el). The sometimes ethereal tunes of Sigur Ros gain depth and complexity from these artist’s interpretations. And the audience gets a wide gamut of feelings to explore and things to think about while listening to the songs. Will the video from the audience submissions (2 October) be able to establish similar connections with the other promos in the series? What could easily have been a collection of disparate videos, are brought together by the unitary characteristics of the Valtari album. The music videos not only function independently but also in relation to each other. Will the video chosen from the audience submissions be able to establish similar connections with the other promos in the series? Like said, we love and adore Ryan McGinley’s Varud – a music video that is as magical as it is unsettling. Set on the streets of New York City, we witness a young girl in a gold wig hopping down the streets, freezing time wherever she goes. She could be an elf, but might as well be a crazy person. We’re talking about New York here, right. McGinley, the Jersey-born director who famously started documenting his friends (often in the nude and posing in nature), successfully mixes fiction with documentary, creating a video that looks like it was shot in “the twilight zone” or whatever you call that strange space-time in between dream and reality.

Create your Playlist

Drop clips here to create a playlist Sorry, you can’t add this item to the playlist
Prev
Next
Clear

Share Playlist


    Varud

    The Icelandic band Sigur Ros gives film-makers complete artistic freedom (and a modest budget) to create visuals for tracks from their newest album Valtari. There is more to come, but our fav so far is Varud, directed by star photographer and long-time darling of the art world, Ryan McGinley.

    Rather than promoting specific tracks, with this series the band wants to discover what kind of visuals their music could inspire. So far, six creative minds worked their creative mojo, with each creator bringing his own aesthetic and subject matter, ranging from the NYC streets (McGinley) to meditations on changes (Arni & Kinski), and the dramatics of letting a beloved person go (Alma Har’el). The sometimes ethereal tunes of Sigur Ros gain depth and complexity from these artist’s interpretations. And the audience gets a wide gamut of feelings to explore and things to think about while listening to the songs. Will the video from the audience submissions (2 October) be able to establish similar connections with the other promos in the series?

    What could easily have been a collection of disparate videos, are brought together by the unitary characteristics of the Valtari album. The music videos not only function independently but also in relation to each other. Will the video chosen from the audience submissions be able to establish similar connections with the other promos in the series?

    Like said, we love and adore Ryan McGinley’s Varud – a music video that is as magical as it is unsettling. Set on the streets of New York City, we witness a young girl in a gold wig hopping down the streets, freezing time wherever she goes. She could be an elf, but might as well be a crazy person. We’re talking about New York here, right.

    McGinley, the Jersey-born director who famously started documenting his friends (often in the nude and posing in nature), successfully mixes fiction with documentary, creating a video that looks like it was shot in “the twilight zone” or whatever you call that strange space-time in between dream and reality.

    Tags: directors from US, live-action


    Electric Cinema

    21 Clips

    Super cinematic live action clips that tell a story.

    2Pause | Freezing Music Video Culture

    The world of music videos has traditionally provided a perfect breeding ground to test new visual styles, VFX and editing techniques. It has also proven to be an extraordinary springboard for some of todays most acclaimed film directors, such as Spike Jonze, Baz Luhrmann and Michel Gondry, to name but three. 2Pause is the second installment of our curated music video website. The old Pause website is still online here.



    You might also like: